Winterim Course Offerings

Registration will be open on December 13.

Welcome to the Winterim Session of Belfast Senior College beginning Thursday, January 17. Classes run for four-consecutive Thursdays, ending February 7. All classes are offered at the Hutchinson Center, Route 3, in Belfast. Please register early for the classes you would like to take to avoid disappointment and be sure to order your text(s) and/or materials at least TWO weeks in advance.

Annual registration fee is $25.00, valid Sept. 1 through Aug. 31, and is required for all courses, except summer, which is free. Six-week courses are $35.00, four-week courses are $30.00, and one- or two-day courses are $20.00. You may register: 1) online; 2) by submitting a printed form by mail, or 3) in person at the Senior College Office. All messages will be forwarded to the registrar. Please note that YOU are now responsible for purchasing the text(s) and/or materials, if required for you course. N.B. If inclement weather, please call Senior College at 338-8033. If classes are cancelled, there will be a recorded message any time after 6:30 a.m.

Morning Classes

“Chantons tous!” –Famous French Songs and Their Translations

Instructor: Lila Nation

  • Thursday Morning
  • 9:30 – 11:30 AM

We’re going to sing through this winter! From “Frère Jacques” to “Les feuilles mortes (Autumn Leaves), and “Michèle, ma belle” to “Je ne regrette rien!” (I Regret Nothing!), all will be revealed. No, you don’t have to be a singer, and no, you don’t have to know one word of French; you just need to want to have fun. Some songs are happy, and some are sad, while some songs are silly and others profound. We’ll take them apart then put them back together again with greater understanding and laughter. After all, “Ils ont changé ma chanson,” and yours!

Read More

Making Meaning of Your Heirlooms and a Look at PMM’s Collection

Instructor: Cipperly Good and Kevin Johnson

  • Thursday Morning
  • 9:30 – 11:30 AM
  • Class limit 20
  • Materials Required

Our treasured heirlooms often have sentimental value; they are valuable because of the memories and stories that go with them. The same is true about museum artifacts and images; without the story, they are just another boring relic from the past. In this class, museum staff members will share some of their favorite artifacts and images and explain the context (who, what, where, why, when and how) that makes them valuable. Staff will review best practices for collecting information as well as how to care for your own heirlooms. In the final class, students will take a field trip to the Penobscot Marine Museum for hands-on learning with PMM’s collection.

Week 1: Introduction & Documenting Stories through Objects with Cipperly Good
Week 2: Using Photographs to Jog the Memory with Kevin Johnson
Week 3: Caring for your heirlooms: objects, photographs, and family papers
Week 4: Field trip to PMM to learn about ongoing collections care and documentation projects and to gain hands-on experience working with artifacts and photos.

Class limit 20
Required materials: Bring one object and one photograph that has meaning to you.

Read More

Alexander Hamilton: History and Broadway Meet

Instructor: Peter Reilly

  • Thursday Morning
  • 9:30 – 11:30 AM

This will be essentially a history course about the founding of our country. It will be told through the life and times of Alexander Hamilton. Woven throughout the course will be the music and story behind the Broadway hit musical, “Hamilton.” In studying Hamilton, we will not only share his exciting life and incredible contributions to forming our government, but also learn how the Broadway musical became such a spectacular success. If you have seen the show this course may help explain what you’ve seen; if you haven’t seen it, it may help explain what you will see. Lin-Manuel Miranda will have much to say.

Read More

Exploring Pie Through the “Eyes” of Anthropology

Instructor: Elaine Potoker

  • Thursday Morning
  • 9:30 – 11:30 AM
  • Class Limit 15
  • Required Text

Pie: Who doesn’t have a favorite one or many? Ah…the traditions, the stories, the ingredients and the aromas: Bring all your pie memories—savory and sweet, current and past, to this class. Plan to focus on cultural and other influences on the artisanry of pie in many of its unique varieties and forms. First, we will consider why and if pie deserves to be cameoed in anthropological discussions. Subsequently, we will talk about history and lore related to types of pies. At the conclusion, and maybe along the way with the help of pie fanatics, we’re probably going to have to eat some pie. Nothing like pie to warm the soul in Winterim.

Class limit 15

Required text: “Humble Pie: Musings on What Lies Beneath the Crust” by Anne Dimock. Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2005. ISBN-13:978-0-7407-5465-4 (or ISBN-10 0-7407-5465-3). Please read the “Forward” before the first class and bring the text to class.

Read More

World Scriptures I: East Asia

Instructor: Arlin Larson

  • Thursday Morning
  • 9:30 – 11:30 AM
  • Class Limit 30
  • Required Texts

“The Analects of Confucius” and the “Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu” have provided spiritual, ethical, and cultural foundations for China, Japan, and Korea for over two thousand years. We will explore these texts as paradigms of certain attitudes toward human fulfillment, both temporal and eternal. Seemingly more philosophical than religious, the background for each is the way and will of Heaven. “The Analects” puts sociability at the heart of reality, while the “Tao Te Ching” eschews human artifice in favor of the spontaneity of nature, (the Tao). Rather than contradictory, they have in most times been seen as complementary. Confucius fell out of favor in revolutionary China because of his bias towards conformity and the past but is now staging a comeback. The “Tao Te Ching” was prominent in the United States during the 60’s and 70’s as it seemed to support flouting convention and “doing your own thing.”

Class limit 30

Required texts: “Tao Te Ching by Lao-Tzu” (Author), Stephen Addiss (Author), Stanley Lombardo (Author), Burton Watson (Author). Paperback 128 pages. Hackett Publishers, Oct. 1993. ISBN- 10:0872202321 (or ISBN-13: 978-0872202321) AND “The Analects of Confusius” by Confucius (Author); Simon Leys (Translator). ISBN-10: 0393316998 (or ISBN-13: 978-0393316995

Read More

New Knitting Ideas

Instructor: Judy Beebe

  • Thursday Morning
  • 9:30 – 11:30 AM
  • Bring your own supplies

Bring whatever you are working on or wish you had started, and we will share “take it up a notch!”

Required materials: Bring your own supplies for the project of your dreams! Heavenly Yarns Shop here in Belfast will assist you to purchase what you need.

Read More

A Different Look at War through Film

Instructor: Paul Sheridan

  • Thursday Morning
  • 9:30 – 11:30 AM
  • Class limit 50

Many movies have been made about wars of course, it is a recurring theme in human history. We will review/preview ones that are made by smaller studios or independent makers, and in a variety of countries. Using a mix of trailers, short clips, and at least one complete short movie per class, we’ll discuss the causes and aftermaths of war, as well as its effects on non-combatants. We will add lots of notes, links, and titles to help you watch the complete films on your own.

Class limit 50

Read More

Studio Recording Workshop

Instructor: Steve Chiasson

  • Thursday Morning
  • 9:30 – 11:30 AM
  • Class limit 10

This class will give you an opportunity to get hands-on with the tools and techniques of a modern, professional recording studio. The emphasis will be on making actual recordings, with relevant instructional content delivered in the context of the process itself. You’ll have opportunities both to record a session and/or be recorded yourself.

Class limit 10
No required materials but participants might find “The Blackbird Academy Foundations” a useful reference, available on Amazon for $13.38. N.B. All classes will be held at Forest Audio Studio in the Belfast Center.

Read More

Afternoon Classes

Crafting a Photograph

Instructor: Jim Kosinski

  • Thursday Afternoon
  • 1:00 – 3:00 pm
  • Class Limit 12

Craft: verb; to create with skill and careful attention to detail.

This workshop is intended for those who have basic photography and photo editing skills. We will explore in depth the entire process of bringing a photograph to life, from working with different subjects and light to using cameras, scanners, editing software, preparing images for use on the internet, and printing. Directed photo shoots during class time will give you a deeper understanding of just how to envision and joyfully carry out your creative ideas.

Class limit 12

Read More

Pick Your Poison Watercolor Workshop

Instructor: Nancy Blatz

  • Thursday Afternoon
  • 1:00 – 3:00 pm
  • Class Limit 14

Great four-week course for all levels, especially beginners. Paint any subject or style you want. The emphasis will be on refining techniques, brush work, design and composition. Students should bring their own supplies. Per usual, the best paper and paint yield the best results. If you are a beginner and need supplies, let me know.

Class limit 14

Required materials: None, but there will be an extra charge for beginners who need the instructor to provide materials.

Read More

“Once Upon a Time…” –Fairytales and Why We Love Them

Instructor: Nancy Perkins

  • Thursday Afternoon
  • 1:00 – 3:00 pm

Most of us have grown up with Fairy Tales whether from Europe, Asia, Africa, or Native America. These magical tales of humans, animals, or spirits have inspired movies, books, and dramas and remain vivid to many of us today. This class will explore the fairy tale tradition of Western culture and examine some of the inspired tales that continue to fascinate humankind. We will share insights of our favorite stories, read numerous classic tales, and discover the back stories of these creations. From the earliest tales to the Disney classics, we will relive the universal appeal of those stirring words, “once upon a time” and “happily ever after.”

Required text: None, but a copy of Grimm’s Fairy Tales is encouraged.

Read More

An Optimist’s Take on Climate Change

Instructor: Paul Kando

  • Thursday Afternoon
  • 1:00 – 3:00 pm

Climate change is a major existential threat, and an “externalized” byproduct of capitalism and the Industrial Revolution. Like so many man-made challenges, it is inseparably connected to other major challenges, including a global economic crisis and energy insecurity. The silver lining: these crises are human engineered. Therefore, even if we can’t undo all the damage already caused, we can still change course. We have access to the knowhow and the technology. Do we have the will?

Read More

Land-based Salmon and Other Fish: Opportunities and Challenges

Instructor: Steve Eddy and Melissa Malmstedt

  • Thursday Afternoon
  • 1:00 – 3:00 pm
  • Class Limit 30

Aquaculture is the world’s fastest growing food production sector and it now accounts for about 50% of total seafood consumption. Most aquaculture occurs under semi-natural conditions in outdoor ponds, lagoons, or at sea, but in recent years indoor farms using sophisticated recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) technology have been established or proposed, including two salmon farms in Maine. This course will provide knowledge and scientific understanding of the opportunities and challenges presented by intensive land-based aquaculture. Students will learn about the history and importance of aquaculture as a food production system, globally and in Maine. Salmon aquaculture here and abroad will be the focus, but other species will also be discussed. Students will learn salmon biology and life history, and how the nutritional and health needs of salmon are met under culture. All aspects of recirculating aquaculture systems will be discussed, including water use and treatment, waste management, and regulatory issues. Information will be provided in the larger context of the social acceptance and environmental sustainability of intensive aquaculture.

Class limit 30

Read More

Political Novels, Personal Stories, and “The Idea of America”

Instructor: Duncan Newcomer

  • Thursday Afternoon
  • 1:00 – 3:00 pm
  • Text Required

“O, I see flashing that this America is only you and me.” –Walt Whitman

How would you like to sit down by the fire some wintry day and listen to John Steinbeck talk about America? Or Harper Lee, or Mark Twain? That’s what we will do in the first hour of this four-week course, read passages aloud from our favorite American novels. These books have defined what America means for us, with the scenes and characters and language that have made America great or not. In the second hour we will share personal
stories of the events in our own lives that have defined what America means to us now, good or bad. Democracy and social progress come out of conversation first, political public policy second. Not only are all politics local, they are verbal.

Required texts: “Imagining a Great Republic: Political Novels and the Idea of America” by Thomas Cronin. Rowman & Littlefield. ISBN978-1-5381-0571-0 AND “The Idea of America: Our Values, Our Legacy, Our Future,” by John O. Wilson. Available through Colonial Williamsburg Foundation or The Idea of America Network. ISBN 978-0-87935-291-2. Available on Amazon for approx.. $2.95, or at your local bookstore.

Read More

Learn (or Re-Learn) Latin!

Instructor: Rebecca Jessup

  • Thursday Afternoon
  • 1:00 – 3:00 pm
  • Class Lime 20

If you ever studied Latin, no matter how long ago, you had lasting benefits, and you remember more than you realize. If you’ve never studied Latin, Senior College is the perfect place to start! Latin was the language of Cicero, Ovid, and Virgil, and countless other brilliant writers over many centuries. It is the foundation of many modern Romance languages, and the source of thousands of English words. Learn (or re-learn) the basics of Latin, including how Latin informs English through prefixes, stems, and suffixes. We’ll review enough Latin vocabulary and grammar to read some selections from Saint Jerome’s famous Vulgate Bible. Don’t think you can do it? Just try!

Class limit 20

Read More

One-Day Classes

Fermentation Fundamentals

Instructor: Frank Giglio

  • Tuesday, January 22, 2019, 9:30 – 3:00 p.m.
  • 9:30 am to 3:00 pm

With thousands of years of use, fermented foods and beverages have been a staple in people’s diets around the globe. Producing and consuming fermented foods has a host of benefits that go well beyond the addition of probiotics. Learn the” how’s” and “why’s” we should be making fermented foods an integral part of our daily lives.

Read More

From Beaux Arts to Modernism: A 20th Century Family Legacy of Architecture in Cincinnati, Ohio

Instructor: Elizabeth Garber

  • Friday, January 25, 2019, 9:30 – 3:00 p.m.
  • 9:30 am to 3:00 pm

If you enjoy architectural history, this class will explore the buildings of the two most significant Cincinnati architects of the 20th century, F.W. Garber, and Woodie Garber. This class is based on a eries of architectural talks that Elizabeth gave at the Cincinnati Public Library, The Mercantile Library, and the Glendale Historical Preservationist Society. Elizabeth will also share her experiences of growing up as a student of Modernism and especially about learning about the work of Le Corbusier.

Read More

The Tragedy of Shakespeare’s “King Richard II”

Instructor: Nick Turner

  • Tuesday, January 29, 2019, 9:30 – 3:00 p.m.
  • 9:30 am to 3:00 pm
  • Required Text

“For heaven’s sake, let us sit upon the ground
And tell sad stories of the death of kings.”

We’ll read and discuss “Richard II”.

Required text: A copy of Shakespeare’s “King Richard II” in any form.

Read More