Fall Course Offerings 2016

Here is an archival listing of our Fall 2016 course offerings.

Morning Classes

The Architecture Of Christian Churches

Instructor: Christopher Glass

  • Thursday Morning
  • 9:30 – 11:30 AM

The architecture of Christian churches has been the most important part of the story of western architecture, at least until the 20th century. This course will explore how Christians adopted and adapted Roman and Jewish models and went on to create new building forms that changed how all buildings were made. We will look in detail at some major monuments like Hagia Sophia, St. Peter’s, and the Gothic Cathedrals and will also examine how these buildings shaped smaller, local places of worship, and how the churches we see in Maine today are heirs of these traditions. Note: this is an enhanced version of the course given in 2012.

In addition to the six classes, this course includes the opportunity to tour three churches in Searsport and two churches in Belfast. If you are curious about the history and design of the stained glass windows and historical nuances in these local churches, this is the time to ask your questions.

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The World Between 1950-2000 – The U.S. Becomes a Super Power

Instructor: Ron Jarvella

  • Thursday Morning
  • 9:30 – 11:30 AM

This is a continuation of the course “The World the First Half of the 20th Century: The Rise of the U.S. as Superpower” that Ron taught last fall. The class will look decade by decade at the cold war, the U.S. leadership in world affairs, its contributions, and its errors.

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The Hidden People of North Korea

Instructor: Richard MacIntyre

  • Thursday Morning
  • 9:30 – 11:30 AM
  • Note: This class will not meet on September 22. Final class day will be October 27

“The Hidden People of North Korea” will explore the developments in North Korea since the Korean War and how they created a closed feudalistic society which led to horrendous hardships and cycles of poverty under a totalitarian regime. We will take a look at the lives of the leadership elite, the common people and the newer private markets. We will also learn more about those who barely survive in the gulags.

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The 60’s

Instructor: Barbara LeGendre

  • Thursday Morning
  • 9:30 – 11:30 AM
  • Class size is limited to 20 students

The 60’s! So long ago yet still so haunting: civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, drugs, feminism, alternative lifestyles, environmentalism, sexual revolution, Back to the Land, rage, heartfelt sentiment. Come read the great questioners – their essays, poetry, speeches, and short fiction: Nikki Giovanni, James Baldwin, Susan Sontag, Rachel Carson, Kate Millett, Martin Luther King Jr., Thomas Merton, and Allen Ginsberg. Hear these voices once again in this discussion focused class.

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Beginning Conversational French

Instructor: Lila Nation

  • Thursday Morning
  • 9:30 – 11:30 AM
  • Class is limited to 16 students
  • Class Full, registration closed

Did you have a few years of French in high school or college but have forgotten almost everything you learned, or maybe you’ve had no French at all but always wanted to give this beautiful language a try?  The opportunity to begin mastering conversational French is NOW!  This introductory course will be taught by our own Lila Nation, who not only holds a Master’s in Teaching French and has been teaching French for 35 years but also travels to French-speaking areas every year to stay current in the language and cultures – to the south of France last summer and to Québec this September.  Qu’attendez-vous? (What are you waiting for?)

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The Life and Times of Winston Churchill, Part Two (1930 – 1965) Revisited

Instructor: Peter Reilly

  • Thursday Morning
  • 9:30 – 11:30 AM
  • Part One is NOT a prerequisite for taking Part Two.

For those of us who were unable to take Part Two last spring, Pete Reilly is offering it again this fall. Part One is NOT a prerequisite for taking Part Two.

Part II of the Winston Churchill course continues the overview of one of the most influential persons in the 20th century and perhaps the greatest statesman of the 20th century. Fortunately for us and history, there is much written about his life and times, including his own great writings. Again, through the telling of Winston Churchill’s life, we will look at the monumental events that cast their shadow not just on Great Britain but also on the world. Holding the British Empire together through two world wars, a depression, changing cultural values, worker organization, etc., was his mission. While holding the British Empire intact was not to be one of his achievements, leading the free world in times of crisis was. Winston Churchill was not only a witness to but also a part of the great events of the 20th century.

In summary, the course will not just be a study of a great man’s life; it will also be a study of the events, people and times that shaped that life. Hopefully it will also be a study of how decisions, events and happenings in the 20th century have subsequently impacted and shaped our world today.

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Afternoon Classes

East-Central Europe: Buffer Zone, Battleground, or Bridge to a Better World?

Instructor: Richard Topping

  • Thursday Afternoon
  • 1:00 – 3:00 pm

Two class sessions will review the region’s recent turbulent history from 1890 to 1989 and between 1989 and 2014 (from the collapse of communist rule to the start of a new “not-so-cold” war).

Three class sessions will focus on how this “New Europe” is coping with major problems besetting the region as a whole or as individual countries; for example, navigating between three regional powers (Russia, Turkey and Germany); sorting out relations with the fraying European Union, an over-extended NATO and a less-than-completely-reliable U.S. ally; dealing with refugees from the Middle East and Africa; and paying the costs of globalization. These challenges all contribute to increased socioeconomic tensions and ultra-nationalism throughout much of the region and a discrediting of democracy leading to a new enthusiasm for authoritarian regimes in some countries.

The final session will examine alternative possible futures for East-Central Europe: as a buffer between Russia and/or Turkey and the West, the turf on which yet another major war (hot or cold) will be fought, or a much-needed bridge between rival major powers or clashing civilizations.

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America’s Music: The Triumph of Country and Western

Instructor: Neal Harkness

  • Thursday Afternoon
  • 1:00 – 3:00 pm

From humble roots in the folk music of Appalachia and the campfire songs of the Western prairies, Country Music has grown into a billion dollar industry, the most popular musical genre in the United States. In its history it has taken many paths, and we will follow them through the development of Bluegrass and the heyday of the singing cowboys, the rise of the Nashville Sound, Outlaw Country and the Young Country movement. We will examine how the music adapted to and thrived in a rapidly changing society, and how it made its contribution to the culture. In music and video, we will learn about the careers of the great artists who have shaped the music: the pioneers such as Jimmy Rodgers and Hank Williams, stars like Patsy Cline, Eddy Arnold and Dolly Parton and the rebels like Johnny Cash and Willie Nelson. Whether you are a lifelong fan or a curious newcomer, this course will provide you with an entertaining and informative overview of the history of Country.

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Preserving and Sharing Your Family History

Instructor: John Elberfeld and Jane McLean

  • Thursday Afternoon
  • 1:00 – 3:00 pm

We all have family pictures, documents, heirlooms, genealogy research, and/or stories and tales that we would like to pass on to future generations. This course will offer guidelines for preserving what we have and offer suggestions for passing on this material and information. The instructors and guest speakers will show the many techniques available to prepare what we have so those who inherit it or receive it as a donation can appreciate the significance of what they are given. Guest experts will include a historical society president, a museum curator, an organizer, an appraiser, and a personal historian. Topics covered will explain:
 

  • Preserving the family history by archiving and/or digitizing letters, documents, photographs, films, and family heirlooms such as quilts and tools.
  • Sharing the family history through memory books, scrapbooks, oral and video histories, gifts to family members, and donations to appropriate organizations.
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Gilead

Instructor: Arlin Larson

  • Thursday Afternoon
  • 1:00 – 3:00 pm

Marilynne Robinson, who teaches at the University of Iowa Writer’s Workshop, said she was inspired to write her Pulitzer Prize winning novel “Gilead” after learning that many colleges in the Midwest were founded by Yankees from New England and that these same reformers also led the Abolition movement there. “Gilead” chronicles the lives of three generations of ministers serving the Congregational church in Gilead, IA, which was modeled on the real town of Tabor, a staging ground for John Brown’s raids in Kansas. The narrator, the Rev. John Ames, elderly and in poor health, is writing down this story for his young son, because he realizes he will not live to know the boy as an adult. Ames’ grandfather had been a radical social reformer from Maine who journeyed to Iowa to fight slavery. Reversing stances, his son became a leading pacifist. John, the third generation, writing shortly after World War II, reflects on the tremendous cultural, political, and theological changes that have taken place and on his own sense of vocation. In this last role, he is often the voice of Robinson herself, a leading contemporary religious writer and public intellectual.

As it happens, one group of those college-founding, slavery-fighting reformers went out from Waldo County, Maine. Their story will also be part of the class.

“Gilead” was followed by two other wonderful novels,“Home” and “Lila,” about secondary characters: the disreputable Jack Boughton, Rev. Ames’ namesake, and Ames’ enigmatic hardscrabble second wife, Lila.

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Fundamental Spanish

Instructor: Paul Garcia

  • Thursday Afternoon
  • 1:00 – 3:00 pm

Fundamental Spanish focuses on basic elements, giving emphasis to spoken language skills. One goal will be “thinking on one’s feet” – viable self-expression. Classroom practice spans the gamut from traditional through situational exercises and “total physical response” techniques.

The textbook: The story of the textbook begins when I had been teaching for years at the college level. One morning before class at Husson, I asked a nursing student what the textbook had cost her. I routinely received annotated instructor’s textbooks from publishers for free; the cost hadn’t concerned me as it was between bookstore and student. She told me $87. During the following days I reflected on students working nights and weekends to pay for their education. With my years of teaching high school and college Spanish, I could easily put together a first-year college text during the summer. And I did. That was the first edition, which I’ve re-edited over and over since then.

I’ve used this text with Adult Ed Spanish classes for probably 20 years now. The students, many elderly, some without much academic preparation, have told me how helpful the book has been in learning and enjoying a once formidable foreign language. I’ve followed up on their suggestions. Students’ questions, asked in the course of hundreds of classes, have been integral to the textbook’s design.

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Intermediate Conversational French – Part VI

Instructor: Lila Nation

  • Thursday Afternoon
  • 1:00 – 3:00 pm

You know who you are!  You have either been taking French with Lila Nation here at the Hutch for the past several years, or you have already reached a certain level of proficiency in speaking and have been looking for the opportunity to strengthen your skills while having fun with your peers, or both!  We have covered most of the basics of French grammar, but are constantly reviewing, and every class offers more and deeper occasions to improve.  Don’t be afraid to join us, even if it has been years since you tried parler français.  Ici nous nous encourageons et nous nous amusons en même temps!

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One-Day Classes

Let’s Learn to Draw

Instructor: Sandi Cirillo

  • Thursday September 8, 2016
  • 9:30 am to 3:00 pm
  • Bring a bag lunch
  • Class size is limited to 12 students
  • Class Full, registration closed

If you’ve ever caught yourself doodling, you are indeed drawing. Drawing is the oldest form of written communication and is a favorite leisure activity for many people. In this class, you will explore your creative side as you learn how to create a good composition using techniques such as shading, contrast, perspective, texture, movement, etc. We’ll be experimenting with different drawing materials to enable you to discover which ones you like the best (or the least). Drawing still lifes and landscapes are only a small part of this class. All supplies will be provided. All you need to bring is your enthusiasm to learn something new. So come prepared to enhance your creativity and stimulate your imagination through drawing.

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The American Musical Abroad: “Oklahoma”

Instructor: Richard Brown

  • Tuesday September 27, 2016
  • 9:30 am to 3:00 pm
  • Bring a bag lunch

Instead of offering a fall opera series this year, Dick Brown will teach “The American Musical Abroad” in a series of three one-day classes. The first will be in the Fall, the next in the Winterim session, and the last will be in the Spring.

Rodgers and Hammerstein’s musical “Oklahoma” from 1943 is often talked of as the quintessential American musical. This 1999 production is from London’s Royal National Theatre. Filmed on stage with very fine acting, great singing, and spectacular choreography, it captures the essence of this classic American musical.

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Prompts, Prompts, and More Prompts

Instructor: Cathy Lickteig Makofski

  • Tuesday October 11, 2016
  • 9:30 am to 3:00 pm
  • Bring a bag lunch

Facing a blank page is the reason many of our stories, memoirs, essays or letters never get written. We may have a great idea but when casting about for words to tell the story, they seem to be tied to cement blocks. Sometimes we can free them, but often we can’t. When the struggle becomes too much, we freeze up, then give up. The blank page wins.

Natalie Goldberg, in her very fine book “Writing Down the Bones: Freeing the Writer Within” calls this common affliction “monkey mind.” It’s the voice inside that tells us we can’t write, we don’t know how, and we shouldn’t even try. If you’re facing an empty page and “monkey mind” is undermining your confidence, please join me for a day of prompt-driven writing. The goal of our workshop is to free our minds so that the ideas, thoughts, and experiences that are living deep inside might emerge. We’ll draw on humor, too, since laughter chases “monkey mind’” away. Throughout the day, we’ll write to a wide variety of prompts: quotes, aromas, sounds, sentences, art, individual words, toys, as well as prompts suggested by those in our group. In addition, I will play different kinds of music to see where that might take our writing.

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Special Two-Day Class

The Secret Life of Mushrooms

Instructor: David Porter

  • Wednesday October 5, 2016 –  9:30 am to 3:00 pm
  • Friday October 7, 2016 – 9:30 am to 2:00 pm
  • Bring a bag lunch
  • Class size is limited to 15 students
  • Class Full, registration closed

In this two-day class you will be introduced to the remarkable activities of mushroom fungi that grow in Maine. They are numerous, diverse, and essential to the normal functioning of our forest ecosystem. You will learn how mushroom fungi carry out nature’s recycling by parasitism, decomposition, and especially by mutually beneficial food exchange with forest trees. You will also learn how to identify common poisonous and edible mushrooms that we will observe and collect on a local field trip on October 7 and possibly sample a few of the latter. But mushrooms are just structures for reproduction. The fact that most of the activity of mushroom fungi is hidden from view in the microscopic underground realm is the biggest surprise of the “secret life of mushrooms.” In this class secrets will be revealed.

1. What are fungi? What are mushrooms?

2. How do mushroom fungi “make a living”? How are they important in nature?

3. How many kinds of mushrooms are there? What is the evolutionary history of mushrooms?

4. Where and when do we find them? How does one identify them?

5. How are mushrooms used in the culinary arts?

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