Winterim Course Offerings 2016

Here is an archival listing of our Winterim 2016 course offerings.

Morning Classes

U.S. Presidents and Africa: Kennedy, Carter, Clinton and Obama

Instructor: Bob Rackmales

  • Thursday Morning
  • 9:30 – 11:30 AM

This course relates to the theme of the February 2016 Camden Conference, “The New Africa.” It explores how emerging realities in a de-colonized Africa presented four American presidents with complex challenges, not least of which was resolving conflicts within their own administrations over African issues.

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Modern and Contemporary American Poetry, a Continuing Introduction

Instructor: Ellen Sander

  • Thursday Morning
  • 9:30 – 11:30 AM
  • Class size is limited to 20.

This course is open to those with little or no prior exposure to or understanding of poetry. Continuing with Ellen Sander’s highly praised Modern Poetry courses, we will unravel approachable works of great immediacy, explored in multimedia and anecdotally, through audio, video, collaborative close reading and lively discourse. This course will begin in Winterim and continue into the Spring term.

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Even More Out-of-the-Ordinary Films about War

Instructor: Paul Sheridan

  • Thursday Morning
  • 9:30 – 11:30 AM

Featuring new or expanded films and clips, this is a continuation of the course given in Winterim 2015. War has been an important subject for films since D.W Griffith’s “Birth of a Nation.” Many will remember being moved by “The Caine Mutiny,” “The Best Years of Our Lives” or “Bridge on the River Kwai.” This course will take a somewhat different tack by presenting less well-known films, ones about beginnings, endings, and other effects of war, as well as films from countries we seldom hear about and wars we may have forgotten.

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An Encyclical for Secularists? Pope Francis and Climate Change

Instructor: David Boyer

  • Thursday Morning
  • 9:30 – 11:30 AM
  • Class size is limited to 20

In the last five decades scholars have assessed the origin, makeup, and “health” of an institution vital to democracy, the public sphere. Born of the Enlightenment, this social space has long been considered the preserve of secular reason as the only legitimate argumentative force able to represent the public, critique leaders and elites, and influence laws that affect all citizens. Recently, however, some scholars argue that religion has a right to be included as a full participant in the public sphere. We will use Pope Francis’ encyclical Laudato Si as a case study of the issues involved in the current sociological assessment of the public sphere. Guiding questions: What is the public sphere and what must it do? Can religion be a full participant in the public sphere?

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The Future is Upon Us

Instructor: Team of Instructors

  • Thursday Morning
  • 9:30 – 11:30 AM

The news is filled with stories of change. There are a myriad of questions that warrant expert answers and insights. For example, the days of doctors making house calls are gone, but might we soon be diagnosed, monitored and treated at home with electronic hookups? How soon will we be treating cancer, dementia, and the like more effectively? Is stem cell treatment on the near horizon? Where are “No Child Left Behind,” wall-to-wall testing, and charter schools taking our grandchildren?Why does the United States have a far higher prison population per capita than others? Is drug addiction a big factor? Is global warming causing an increase in extreme weather events?

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French Weirdos Unite

Instructor: Lila Nation

  • Thursday Morning
  • 9:30 – 11:30 AM

Are you a WEIRDO? If you’ve studied French for any length of time, you probably recognize this word as the mnemonic device for identifying situations where the subjunctive mood must be used. This Winterim course, designed specifically for intermediate to advanced learners of French, will provide lots of practice in not only identifying when the subjunctive must be used, but also understanding how and why. Don’t be afraid to jump into this tricky subject; you’ll be surrounded by fellow weirdos!

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Knitting – Get back to or Take it up a Notch

Instructor: Judy Beebe

  • Thursday Morning
  • 9:30 – 11:30 AM

This class is for those who used to knit and want to get back to it or for those who know basics and would like to “take it up a notch.” Join the class to once again have fun with knitting and to stretch your creative muscles. Enjoy the camaraderie of fellow knitters while you learn.

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Afternoon Classes

Maine Women, the Other Half of Maine His -tory

Instructor: Team of Instructors

  • Thursday Afternoon
  • 1:00 – 3:00 PM
  • Class size is limited to 56
  • Class is full, registration is closed

Ginger Rogers, it has been famously noted, could do everything Fred Astaire did. Only she did it backwards and in high heels. In that spunky and joyful spirit, this course orchestrated by former Senior College president Pat Griffith will tell the stories of Maine women who lived boldly and accomplished much for themselves, their communities and the nation. But most did so while rearing children, doing the laundry and making endless fish chowder.

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Let’s Go to the Movies with Harry

Instructor: Harry Kaiserian

  • Thursday Afternoon
  • 12:30 – 3:00 PM
  • Class will begin  at 12:30 PM

“Let’s Go to the Movies With Harry” will feature three current films that are tied together with a common theme: all take place in France and all address challenges to French Haute Cuisine. Haute Cuisine has dominated Western culture for over 200 years but is rapidly losing its impact in today’s world. We will watch “Haute Cuisine,” “Le Chef” and “The 100 Foot Journey” and see how popular cinema addresses the challengers.

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Hobby Botany II

Instructor: Joseph Veilleux

  • Thursday Afternoon
  • 1:00  – 3:00 PM
  • Course modifications will be made to accommodate class interests.

 

Once again people who enjoy botany will have a chance to share their knowledge and to learn more from Joe about identifying plants, foraging, raising houseplants and gardening. This course is an extension of last Winterim’s course; it will include new material and a review of the basics so it is appropriate for former students as well as newcomers. The interplay and sharing among hobbyists make this course special.

Class discussions will cover home gardens, house plants, wildflowers and trees of Maine, and edible and useful wild plants. They will also include the use and comparison of seed catalogs, Maine plant sources, and field guides.

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E. O. Wilson and the Meaning of Human Existence

Instructor: Arlin Larson and Howard Torrey

  • Thursday Afternoon
  • 1:00 – 3:00 PM

This course is a follow-up to Arlin and Howard’s Fall 2015 course, “Humankind in the Cosmos.” It will involve a close reading of Wilson’s The Meaning of Human Existence and discussion of the issues it raises. Participation in the Fall course is not required, but it is recommended that all students read Wilson’s book before the winter session begins.

E. O. Wilson is one of America’s leading scientists and the founder of the field of sociobiology. He believes that the meaning or significance of our lives is best revealed in our evolutionary history. In particular, he points to the conscious and voluntary construction of cooperative societies (“eusociality”) as the crowning human achievement. In the rest of the animal world, this level of cooperation has been achieved only on the unconscious instinctual level by social insects, such as ants and bees. He believes that embracing this science-based perspective can free us from the competition and destructive “tribalisms” of religion, nationalism, and political ideology.

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Ovid’s Metamorphoses in English and Latin

Instructor: Rebecca Jessup

  • Thursday Afternoon
  • 1:00 – 3:00 PM

Ovid (Publius Ovidius Naso, 43 BC – AD 17/18) is one of the immortals of Latin literature, with a controversial and somewhat mysterious life story and an immense talent. He brought the ancient myths to vivid and vibrant life. His greatest work, Metamorphoses, re-tells myths of transformation: Daphne becomes a laurel tree; Actaeon is turned into a stag; Callisto and her child become bears. There are some 250 such stories in the entire Metamorphoses, but during Winterim we will only have time to scratch that rich surface. You don’t have to know Latin to do this; the instructor knows it well enough. If you had a little Latin in high school, some will come back to you. If not, fear not! You’ll learn as we go. We’ll read selections in English, and once we know a given story, we’ll read it again in Latin. Don’t think you can do it? Sure you can!

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Language, Learning and Literacy

Instructor: Wendy Kasten

  • Thursday Afternoon
  • 1:00 – 3:00 PM

How do we learn? How do we learn language? How do we learn to read and write and become literate? This course is designed for people interested in and curious about the process of learning, language learning, and literacy (reading and writing), why some people find reading and writing more difficult, and how to encourage all people to become effective and enthusiastic readers and learners.

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One-Day Classes

Special Two-Day Class

Why Paper Cutting? An Investigative Journey into a very Human Craft

Instructor: Leslie A. Miller

  • February 18 and 19, 2016
  • 9:30 AM to 3:00 PM
  • Paper Cutting Supplies be provided
  • Lunch will also  be provided

Most of us have seen paper cuts and even made some. Do you remember the snow flakes you made every winter in elementary school? Cuts are used in books, ads, and posters. You have all seen them. Paper cutting is done, in some fashion, in every country where paper is available. In some cultures alternative materials are used.

In this two-day workshop we will explore this world-wide craft. The participants will have a folder in which to carry home finished and unfinished work. Trying and sharing as many types of cuts as we can is our goal.

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